Jan 31 2021: The increasingly hollow howl of “job killing” from the fossil fuels industry

You can read it in the response to President Biden’s sweeping climate EO week. You can read it in the objections to Rep. Deb Haaland for the Department of Interior. You can read it in the Senate grilling of Department of Energy candidate Janet Granholm. The totally predictable assertion of “job killing” is being echoed by the fossil fuel industry and their cohorts.

Americans aren’t so ready to agree that our future depends on fossil fuels. In a November 2019 study Pew reported that 77% agreed that the more important energy priority should be developing alternative energy sources such as wind and solar power and hydrogen technology rather than increasing U.S. production of fossil fuels.

Renewables have taken off all across the land, even in Texas. The Houston Chronicle states that “the state ranks first in wind power and third in battery storage capacity. The state is fifth in solar, but the sector is seeing explosive growth, with a $1.6 billion solar farm — the country’s largest — opening outside of Dallas in 2023. Texas is also growing its footprint in the electric vehicle market, with Tesla building a manufacturing plant near Austin.”

Those in the vangaurd recognize the pain some families will face and the need for support in retraining and other measures. Many do not support an all-or-nothing approach. For example, Janet Granholm has pointed to carbon capture, utilization and storage (CCUS) technologies, which essentially reduce carbon in the atmosphere, as important tools in cutting emissions without cutting jobs.

Nations fail when they don’t adapt. The horseless carriage put people out of work, too. This Administration seems determined to move us forward with as little pain as possible. Tune out the hollow men and their backward ways.

https://www.oaoa.com/editorial/views/texas_opinion/texas-view-the-transition-from-fossil-fuel-is-an-opportunity-for-texas/article_b3fd03f0-57cf-11eb-9648-1b60b032fe78.html

https://www.pewresearch.org/science/2019/11/25/u-s-public-views-on-climate-and-energy/